NEIGHBORHOOD GUIDE

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Tribeca

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Secluded, sleepy, and chic, Tribeca is one of New York’s most affluent and exclusive neighborhoods. Just like glitzy SoHo right next door, Tribeca is home to some of the most exciting upscale dining, shopping, and architecture in the city, but unlike SoHo, it miraculously remains an arm’s length from the hustle and bustle associated with New York’s tourist traffic.


Landscape

The boundaries of the triangle below Canal Street (hence, TriBeCa) are Canal Street to the north, Chambers Street to the south, and Broadway to the east, and extending to the Hudson River. Architectural development in the 18th century focused on large industrial buildings, many of which still exist today as residential loft conversions.


History

One of the first suburbs beyond New York’s original city walls, Tribeca saw its first substantial residential real estate developments in the late 18th century, followed by a surge of industrial architecture designed for commercial use. Many of these pre-war industrial buildings still stand today and have been converted to residential use since the migration of artists began the rapid gentrification of the neighborhood in the 1970s. Notable examples of these residential conversions include the American Thread Building, the Ice House, and the Textile Building, all of which house large, dramatic loft spaces commanding some of the highest prices per square foot in the city.